Fish Tank Information

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The Ultimate Freshwater Aquarium Guide is a book that will inform about every aspect fish keeping from A to Z. Click on the link to inspect it.

Here’s a good video about unboxing and setting up a Fluval Spec 5 Gallon Aquarium. It’s a great little tank.

Click on the image below to see more details about the Fluval Spec 5 Gallon Aquarium.

Q and A about Fish Tank Information

Question:  New Fish tank information?Do you have to wash the gravel that you put into it ?
If yes, then how and with what?
Do you also have to wash any decorations you buy before putting them in the tank?
How long do I have to wait before putting fish into my new tank?
If longer than a day, then why do I have to wait that long?
Also if you know any small fish that I could buy, that would be really helpful.
This is my first time having my fish tank, so I want to have all the information so I don’t make any mistakes or do something wrong
The following is what I have :

  • Filter
  • Heater
  • Thermostat
  • Thermometer
  • fish net
  • fish food
  • gravel
  • plants and decoration
  • 15 gallon tank.
Posted by Mackie

Answer:  Do you have to wash the gravel that you put into it ?

  • It needs to be rinsed.

If yes, then how and with what?

  • Luke warm water.

Do you also have to wash any decorations you buy before putting them in the tank?

  • Again, just a rinse in water.

How long do I have to wait before putting fish into my new tank?

  • Until it’s cycled. That’s usually about 6 weeks.

If longer than a day, then why do I have to wait that long?

  • Because an aquarium is incapable of supporting life until the Nitrogen Cycle is completes. Some people cycle with fish, but this will very likely result in dead fish, and at the very least is going to negatively affect the fish’s overall health and longevity. (Cycling with fish stresses them. Stress leads to illness and disease. Illness/disease leads to fishy death.)

Also if you know any small fish that I could buy, that would be really helpful.

  • There are tons of small fish. However, “small” doesn’t necessarily translate to “can be kept in tiny tanks”. Each fish has different volume requirements dependent on it’s size, aggression level, activity level, wast output, etc.

Knowing your aquarium volume would be very helpful.
This is my first time having my fish tank, so i want to have all the information so I don’t make any mistakes or do something wrong

  • Research, research, research. Fish keeping is all sorts of fun, but if you rush into it without knowing what you’re doing, you’ll only end up frustrated with a disaster on your hands.Here are some good places to get you started:

The Nitrogen Cycle: Click Here for fish profiles that include minimum aquarium size, grouping needs, compatibility, etc:
Alphabetically:  Check It Out
Search-by-name: Fish Data Base

Bare-bones basics of aquarium maintenance/care: First Tank GuideFinally, find yourself a good Local Fish Store with which to do business. Pet shops and big box stores tend to employ people who don’t know/care a thing about the fish they sell, and will get you into all sorts of trouble with their advice.OK, you will also need:

  • Gravel vacuum for water changes.
  • A good test kit that includes tests for Ammonia, NitrITES, NitrATES, and PH to get you through the Nitrogen Cycle. (It’s also a good idea to test frequently, I do so before water changes, so that you can know if you’re having any problems before they become fatal.)
  • 15 gallons is fairly small as far as aquariums go.
  • Some fish you might consider include Guppies, Platies, (NO MOLLIES!) a Betta, Pygmy Corys, Celestial Pearl Danios, and Endler’s Livebearers. Smaller shrimp and snails would work as well.

You’ll be limited with that volume, but with careful planning, you should be able to pull off an interesting setup. (I house 1 male Betta and 5 Celestial Pearl Danios in my heavily planted 15 gallon.)

 

Question:  Information about fish tank?

I have a 64 litre cold water fish tank with a filter with 4 fantail goldfish in. I was wondering if you could tell me what levels certain things should be at.

What level should the ammonia be at?
What level should the nitrate (NO3) be at?
What level should the nitrate (NO2) be at?
What should the carbonate hardness be?
The PH?
And the general hardness?

Please help I’m desperate to know so that i can carry out water test and make the water right if  it’s wrong.

Posted by Robyn

Answer:  Ammonia – should be zero. There is no ‘safe’ amount for ammonia. If it’s not zero you’re in trouble. Ammonia causes haemorrhaging in both the fins, internal organs and eventually the main body of a fish. Ammonia can be brought down by water changes or getting those fish into the right sized tank.

Nitrite (NO2) – should also be zero. Again, anything over zero is going to cause problem and fast.
Nitrite inhibits a fish’s ability to absorb oxygen and so asphyxiation is the biggest risk.

Nitrates should be below 40ppm – ideally below 20ppm. Nitrate poisoning can be a longer, more chronic damage and so displays in a variety of ways. The most common being problems with floating/sinking (though this can have many other causes).

Carb Hard – whilst goldies like it moderately hard, the important thing here is to understand the real risk. Soft water has a less stable pH and so pH crashes are much more common – this is especially true because you have a relatively small tank and so water stability is reduced. Test your hardness by all means to understand the risks, and if soft then keep an even closer eye on pH.

PH – Ideally around 7.4 but it’s much more important for goldies to have stable pH. They won’t cope with pH swings so whatever yours is, the key is for you keep it stable. The best way to do this is often through frequent water changes with fresh, dechlorinated water. Be aware that ammonia gets even more toxic once your pH goes above 7.

However, your 64 litres tank is not enough for those fish who really need somewhere around 240 litres and a very large, powerful filter that’s capable of dealing weith their waste. If they are tiddlers then they are probably ok for a couple of months but expect to have to upgrade by at least as much again within 3 months and to the full 240 within a year – it’s much better imo to jump straight to the 240 right now.

If you don’t upgrade that tank is going to get toxic pretty fast and you will need to change water with increasing frequency to keep the water quality up. Within a few months it doesn’t matter how often you are changing water (unless you plan to make it your full time job) you won’t be able to keep up with the waste those fish are going to produce.

Question:  Information on Cycling a tank with tropical fish in it?I have a 10 Gallon tank wiht 8 Fish (including 2 goldfish)…. Its completly fucked coz i didnt read about keeping fish and just relied on info from the shop i bought them for (ive realised the hard way that a pet fish shop in india will not have the patience to talk and explain stuff ok im also dumb, heartless and the rest of the tirades that im gonna get online. All that said and done. Can someone lemme know if its even possible to cycle the tank with the fish in it…… Also have a power filter that causes a lot of currents. Its no fun for the fish and me with the water so messed up.. Is the filter not right for the tank?

And another question. Ive read you need 10 gallons per goldfish… I cant imagine just two fish in a 20 gallon tank… Goldfish or no goldfish…..

Also guys i need information not sermons.

Posted by Ashi

Answer:  Good info here on cycling a tank that already has fish: Http://www.fishforums.net/index.php?show…

The main problem you have is that your tank is very overstocked. It would help to know what the other fish are, but for a start you’ll probably need to get rid of the goldfish.

The ’10 gallons per goldfish’ rule that you’ve heard is actually incorrect. For fancy goldfish you’d need 20-30 gallons for the first fish, and an extra 10 gallons for each additional fish. For common goldfish you’d need DOUBLE that! 🙂
They may start out small, but goldfish grow very big, over a foot long in some varieties.

Also, as goldfish produce such a lot of waste, if you keep them I think you’ll find it very difficult to keep your ammonia and nitrite levels low while the tank cycles.

As for the filter, if it’s causing so much current that the fish are struggling to swim then yeah, it sounds like it’s too powerful for the size of the tank. Is there any way to adjust the flow?

 

 Fluval Chi with Paradise Fish

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